“No offense, but I’m not actually going to read this” said a client last week about my Final Evaluation Report.  I’ve been gathering data for two years and have spent countless hours putting it together.  Actually, I don’t take offense.  The final report format requires of me a certain amount of comprehensiveness; by which you can also envision a swath of dust-catching pages full of detailed data, long explanations, and figures. 

In fact, I consider the final report an essential document, because it is the full version that details the methodology, data sources, analysis and other important information.  I know, however, that this is not the final product that my client wants to see.  It’s just the repository for all of the relevant information, including appendices with all of the survey instruments, interview protocols, and detailed results. 

What my client wants to see is a richer representation of the data.  They want to see it in colour, in context.  They want to know what it means.  This is one of the most exciting and meaningful parts of my work.  I have created a number of reports in association with the final report, which help to visualize the data available, and help explain the relationships between different aspects of the work.  This “report” is no longer one thing; it is a variety of versions and formats which may have multiple goals: understanding the process of a particular strategy, articulating outcomes within a combination of strategies, illustrating the results of a particular method, and communicating with different kinds of audiences ranging from internal decision-makers to community partners. This is another step beyond data analysis, drawing on skills in communication and design, and it’s challenging but rewarding.

You can find out more about better evaluation reporting from the exceptional Kylie Hutchinson, who is a great guide in making sense of data in every situation.  There are also other helpful resources out there, such as Stephanie Evergreen and Ann K. Emery.

This is the new evaluation reporting.  Someone is actually going to read the evaluation report.  Our ability to create a meaningful, accessible report means that it will have a better chance of supporting important decisions to come and improving the work being done.   Personally, I find that very exciting!

 


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