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I recently presented a workshop on confidence and motivation for a mentorship program I support, and was asked to provide more concrete examples of how to nurture and maintain confidence and motivation. 

As an entrepreneur, I need to keep up my motivation in the face of a multitude of opportunities and challenges; as a leader, I need to maintain my confidence- trusting that I’m doing my best, while knowing how to ask for help, support my team, and create space for everyone to bring their best self so that we’re all contributing in the most meaningful way possible.  It’s a balancing act that takes patience and humility, plus the dedication to continuously build new skills. 

Here are some of my suggestions:

Prioritize

1.       Read Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

2.       If you’re in a rush, skip to the part about what’s urgent, and what’s important.  Do the exercise to help yourself prioritize

Be Yourself

1.       Figure out your social style and be yourself

2.       Read about the concept of kintsukuroi- learn about accepting change and embracing the beauty of what comes next

3.       Try new things

Stay Motivated

1.       Create a routine

2.       Take time to do the things you love

3.       Type “confidence” or “motivation” into youtube or pinterest or another sharing site, and get inspired, every morning or evening

4.       Subscribe to Notes from the Universe for free daily motivation

Enjoy!


 
 
I was reviewing my achievements and learnings for 2015: working with great new clients, building even stronger relationships with existing clients, taking on new leadership roles, letting go of volunteer commitments I could no longer maintain, communicating using media that is new to me, presenting and learning from others at conferences and events, and building the facilitation and training side of my work.

I was preparing to make some resolutions for the new year, when an email from the Chopra Lifestyle Centre helped me reorient my thoughts.  The article suggested that people are more likely to achieve goals than to stick to resolutions.  In my own work I would have suggested the same thing.  I had forgotten this simple yet transformative thing when considering my year ahead!

Goals help to orient us.  They keep us “on track” exactly because if we know our goals, we can always figure out our direction no matter where we are on the path, or how we’ve gotten lost along the way.  Goals give us a tangible “what” to work towards, and leave it up to our creativity to bring our goals into reality.

Resolutions tend to be more about “how” we do things, which is harder to adapt, less motivational, and not as easy to visualize.  With that in mind, I have some inspiring goals I’ll be working on in 2016.

Thanks to everyone who helped me learn and grow in 2015.  I wish you all the best in 2016.

 
 
TedxMontrealWomen took place this weekend,  and I had the good fortune of attending with two brilliant women. We listened and reflected throughout the day on the presentations organized around the theme of daring greatly. It was both a personal and professional challenge to get to know ourselves better and bring more of our best selves into the work we do.

For those of us who work with complex issues and challenges that often seem intractable, the inspiring words from women in science,  technology,  business,  social development and art served as a moving reminder that we need to tap into our passion to be at our most powerful.

Skawennati is an artist and independent curator creating future images of thriving Aboriginal communities using digital media.  She works with youth to express their culture and personal journeys through video games and created an Aboriginally-determined territory in cyberspace called CyberPoWow.  Skawennati and the other speakers have found their purpose and are fully engaged with making the world a better place by giving expression to their powerful dynamism and unique talents.
 
We left the event recharged and ready to create stronger relationships and build an ever more mindful practice.